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Showing posts from April, 2006

Familiarity breeds...

well, sometimes it can breed a whole lot of things that we aren't sure that we need or want. Such as those people that you treat nicely and are rewarded with a snarky attitude or even lewd suggestions. But sometimes familiarity breeds success... And in the case of Jenny Crusie and Bob Mayer they are reaping the benefits of familiarity in droves. Last year at conference time they decided to start a blog and sites dedicated to their new venture of tandem writing of Romantic Adventures. As they said during a talk at the NEC conference, no one was quite sure what was going to happen with a book written from a male and female perspective alternatively. But since both had a strong readership already the idea of combining their efforts and promoting their difference became the linchpin in their successful book launch of Don't Look Down.DLD, as they affectionately call it, hit the NYT list at #21! Nothing to sneeze at especially when you add to that the fact that this is basically an …

Guardian Angel

Clearly, someone up there is looking out for me. Someone decided that if I was ever going to get this book to the shelf that I was going to need an angel. And in this case, they sent me Julie. Julie is my editor assigned by Tekno/Five Star who is helping me with the edits for my book. What she deserves is a medal the size of Ohio, but what she gets in it's place is a very grateful author. You see, somewhere along the way in my writing career I listened to all of the rules that I was told and I started trying to implement them to make my writing stronger. Some of these rules were the result of college writing classes. Granted, my professor was wonderful and encouraging, but she was a "literary" writer (and I don't mean that in any kind of sarcastic way as some writer's do). And she wanted me to learn the rules well, constantly pushing them into my already overloaded, too-old-for-college-but-gonna-do-it-anyway head. I bow to Ann Wescott Dodd, you taught me to perse…